Constellation: Sagittarius
Right Ascension: 18h 3.5m
Declination: -28 16m
Distance: 5,100 ly
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Barnard 86 is a dark nebula located in the constellation of Sagittarius. The nebula is dense enough to block the background stars in this densely populated area. Also visible is the open cluster NGC 6520, which may be associated with the nebula.

 

 

Telescope: GSO RC10
Camera: Atik 314l+
Constellation: Sagittarius
Right Ascension: 18h 02m 23s
Declination: −23° 01′ 48″[
Distance: 4,100 ly
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Discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, the Trifid consists of several different components. First there is the open cluster of stars that formed from the nebula. The ionizing radiation from those stars causes the gas to glow with a reddish light. Reflecting star light of those stars off the surrounding dust gives us a blueish reflection nebula. Also visible are the thicker bands of dust and gas that give the nebula its name, roughly dividing it into three sections. The nebula lies approximately 5000 light years away in the constellation of Sagittarius.


 

Telescope: GSO RC10
Camera: ZWO 1600 MM
Constellation: Serpens
Right Ascension: 18h 18m 48s
Declination: −13° 49'
Distance: 5,700 ly
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M16 is a young open cluster surrounded by an emission nebula, it was made famous by the Hubble image "Pillars of Creation" visible in the center of the nebula. NASA revisits the Eagle Nebula

The nebula has several active star forming regions in the nebula, and the nebula shines by emission light from the young massive O type stars. The cluster is located in the Sagittarius arm at a distance of about 7,000 light years away.


Telescope: GSO RC10
Camera: ZWO 1600 MM
Constellation: Monoceros
Right Ascension: 6h 39m 10s
Declination: +8° 45′
Distance: 2,500 ly
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NGC 2261 is often called Hubble's Variable Nebula. Named after Edwin Hubble, who carried out some of the earlier studies of this object. Discovered in 1783 by William Herschel, and was the first object photographed by the 200 inch Hale telescope.

It was Hubble who first noticed the changes in the nebula in photographs. The object changes in brightness and shadows in the structure of the nebula. The changes occur over weeks and months. The best theory explaining it, is dense knots of dust streamers cast shadows on the reflection nebula. The nebula is illuminated by the star R Mon, which is a young Orion type star. It is an irregular, eruptive type of variable star that can vary as much as 2 magnitudes in brightness.

Telescope: GSO RC10
Camera: ZWO 1600 MM
Constellation: Cepheus
Right Ascension: 00h 01m 08.58s
Declination: +67° 25′ 17.0″
Distance: 2,900 ly
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NGC 7822 also referred to as Sharpless 171 is star forming region of gas and dust located in the constellation of Cepheus.

One of the stars in this region is BD+66 1673 is one of the hottest stars discovered in our corner of the galaxy with a surface temperature of 45,000K, and a luminosity of ~100,000 times of our Sun. It is an O5 type, and is also an Algol type eclipsing binary and the probable ionizing star of the region. It is also a member of the Berkley 59 star cluster.

 

 

 

Telescope: EDT 80mm Reftactor
Camera: Atik 314l+
Constellation: Cepheus
Right Ascension: 21h 01m 35.60s
Declination: +68° 10′ 10.0"
Distance: 1,300 ly

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NGC 7023 is another reflection nebula located in the constellation of Cepheus. The light from a cluster of stars reflect off the dust grains with a blueish light.

 

 

 

 

Telescope: EDT 80mm Reftactor
Camera: Atik 314l+