Displaying items by tag: Open Cluster

Saturday, 21 October 2017 14:55

NGC 869,NGC 884 Double Cluster in Perseus

The Double cluster in Perseus is a pair of open clusters (NGC 869 and NGC 884) located in the constellation of Perseus. Both are young clusters at an age of around 12.8 million year old, and contain many blue-white super giant stars. The clusters are located 7,500 light years distant and are separated from each other by several hundred light years. They are located in the Perseus arm of the Milky Way Galaxy, while we are located in the Orion arm.

Imaged with the ED80CFT refractor and the ZWO 1600MMC camera using RGB filters.

 

Published in Open Clusters
Saturday, 23 September 2017 23:16

M 11 with a Milky Way Background.

 Messier 11 is an rich and compact open cluster located in the constellation of Scutum containing an estimated 2900 stars. It borders the northern end of the Scutum Cloud which is a dense section of the visible Milky Way. It's estimated age is between 220 and 250 million years. Like most open clusters, it's stars will eventually disperse through out the Milky Way. It was added to Charles Messier catalog in May, 1764.

Imaged with the ED80CFT refractor and ZWO 1600 MMC mono camera through LRGB filters,


 

 

Published in Open Clusters
Thursday, 24 August 2017 15:52

M 7

An open cluster of stars in the constellation of Scorpio. The cluster consists of about 80 members, and lies at a distance of around 980 light years. Charles Messier cataloged the cluster in 1764. The cluster resides in front of the Milky Way backdrop showing a small sample of the estimated 100 billion stars that make up our Milky Way galaxy.

Imaged with ED80CFT and the ZWO 1600MMC camera.

 

Published in Open Clusters
Friday, 11 November 2016 16:46

NGC 869,NGC 884 Double Cluster in Perseus

NGC 869 and NGC 884 are commonly called the Double Cluster. Located in the constellation of Perseus, both are young clusters with an age of 12-13 million years old and are only separated by a few hundred light years. Estimated distance to the clusters is 7000 light years.

Oddly enough, Charles Messier didn't include them in his catalog, even though they were know from ancient times.



15 x 120 second exposures through R/G/B filters with the 80 mm refractor.

Published in Open Clusters
Thursday, 13 October 2016 18:09

NGC 6946, NGC 6939 Galaxy vs Open Cluster

On the left we have NGC 6939, an open cluster located in the rich star fields of the constellation of Cepheus. It lies at an estimated distance of 3860 light years.

On the right, is NGC 6946, an intermediate spiral galaxy. It is often called the Fireworks Galaxy. Despite being a third smaller than the Milky Way galaxy, it has had a high rate of supernovas in the last century. Nine recorded supernovas, where as the Milky Way averages one per century. It is located at a distance of 18 to 22 million light years away.

 

Imaged with the ED80CFT refractor, and Atik 314L+ mono ccd.

15 x 300 second exposures through R/G/B filters and 84 x 180 second through Lum filter.

Published in Galaxies
Thursday, 13 October 2016 15:22

NGC 7789

NGC 7789 is an open cluster in Cassiopeia. Often called Caroline's Rose or The White Rose. It was discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783. The cluster lies at a distance of 7600 light years away. I was curious about the particularly red bright star at the 2 o'clock position from the cluster. It is a red giant variable star of the Mira class, and its designation is WY Cas. In an approximately 476 day cycle, it varies from magnitude 16.9 up to a brightness of magnitude 10. It is near the peak in brightness in its cycle, but has no recent observations of its exact magnitude.




45 x 120 second exposures through R/G/B filters with the 80 mm refractor and Atik 314L+ mono ccd camera.

Published in Open Clusters
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