Displaying items by tag: Open Cluster

Thursday, 30 November 2017 22:45

M 39 (2017)

Messier 39 is an open cluster located in Cygnus. It contains an estimated 30 members and an age of approximately 200 - 300 million years. A wide and loose cluster with a starry background.

Imaged with the ED80CFT refractor and ZWO1600 mono camera.

Published in Open Clusters
Friday, 06 April 2018 14:34

M 48

Messier 48, an open cluster in the constellation of Hydra. Charles Messier originally recorded a wrong position for it, so it was "lost" until later astronomers identified it as NGC 2548. The cluster contains around 80 stars with three yellow giant stars. 

Published in Open Clusters
Tuesday, 27 March 2018 18:01

M 46 Open Cluster and Planetary Nebula Times 2

Messier 46 is an open cluster located in the constellation of Puppis. The cluster contains approximately 500 stars and is estimated to be 300 million years old. Also visible in the cluster is a planetary nebula designated NGC 2438, however the nebula does not appear to be part of the cluster as it's radial velocity is different. Also barely visible is another planetary PK231+4.1 up and left of M46.

Published in Open Clusters
Wednesday, 21 March 2018 16:39

M 41

Messier 41 is an open cluster located in Canis Major near the brightest star in the sky, Sirius. First recorded notice of it was by Giovanni Battista Hordierna in 1645. Charles Messier added it to his catalog in January 1765.

The cluster consists of approximately 100 members, the brightest is an orange giant K3 type star located near the center of the cluster.

Taken with the ED80cft and Zwo1600 mono camera.

Published in Open Clusters
Friday, 16 March 2018 14:13

NGC 4755 The Jewel Box Cluster

NGC 4755, The Jewel Box Cluster is a young open cluster in the southern constellation of Crux. Taken with a remote scope in Australia while I waited out the clouds here. One of the youngest open clusters near us at an estimated age of 14-16 years, it contains many super-giant stars that haven't had time to burn through their fuel at their furious rate. 

Published in Open Clusters
Friday, 29 December 2017 16:07

NGC 2244 Rosetta Nebula

The Rosetta Nebula, also known as Cadwell 49, and sometimes referred to as NGC 2244, although that actually refers to the open cluster in the nebula. The nebula is located in the constellation of Monoceros at a distance of 5,200 lightyears.

Imaged with the ED80cft 80 mm refractor and ZWO 1600 mono camera using Ha, and RGB filers.

 

Published in Nebulas
Friday, 29 December 2017 12:44

NGC 281

Also known as IC 11, or Sh2-184, and is occasionally referred to as the Pacman nebula due to its resemblance to the Pacman game's main character. The surrounding gas and dust is ionized by the open cluster IC 1590 which gives it a reddish glow. Several darker clumps can be seen which are called Bok globules. NGC 281 lies some 9500 light years away in the constellation of Cassiopeia. It was first noted by E. E. Barnard.

The image was taken with the EDCFT 80 mm refractor and the mono version of the ZWO 1600 camera. Images wee from Ha filter to bring out the red glow, and R/G/B filters for the normal colors.

 

Published in Nebulas
Friday, 03 November 2017 14:48

NGC 457 ET Cluster

NGC 457, better known as the ET cluster or the Owls cluster, is an open cluster located in the constellation of Cassiopeia



Imaged with the 80 mm refractor and ZWO 1600 mono camera.

Published in Open Clusters
Friday, 03 November 2017 13:19

NGC 7789 Caroline's Rose

Ngc 7789, or more poetically  known  as Caroline's Rose, or the White Rose was discovered by Caroline Herschel. An open cluster in the constellation of Cassiopeia at a distance of 7.6 thousand light years. An estimated 1,000 stars make up the cluster.

 

Published in Open Clusters
Wednesday, 01 November 2017 14:39

M 45 - Pleiades

The Pleiades is an open cluster located in the constellation of Taurus. At a distance of only 444 light years, its one of the closer open clusters. The dust surrounding them was originally thought to be left over from their formation, but it is now thought the cluster is moving through a dusty region of space. The blueish color of the surrounding nebula comes from light reflecting off the dust.

Known since ancient times, Charles Messier added it to his list of comet like objects in March 1769, even though it would be difficult to confuse them with a comet.

Imaged with the 80mm refractor and ZWO 1600 camera.

 

 

 

 

Published in Open Clusters
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